“ Be the Change that you want to see in the world. ” ...is by Mahatma Gandhi...

12 febbraio 2011

Meridians & Psycho-Emotional Aspects


Introduction



The meridian energies of our planetary body the earth or meridia as it is know to the other worlds in the universe and Cosmic Energy, Tele-plasma, the two cosmic meridians and the 5 earth meridians Metal/Ether, Wood/ Air, Fire, water, and earth.


It is the meridian energies that support life on earth. For this is the genetic code of this planet and every living planet in the universe and the parallel universes all have their own genetic code or blue print.


We all know that the cosmic energies affect our tides and weather but it is known that they also affect the auric field of the human energy system. See the seven meridians and the seven charkas in the auric field all align with one another and our body is supported by this system of echo energies or invisible plasma energies of the planet meridia or earth.


Here is a chart to explain how this all works.



Five Merdian Energie


-Meridians
Fifth Meridian:
Metal / Ether Meridian
Forth Meridian:
Wood / Air Meridian
Third Meridian:
Fire Meridian
Second Meridian:
Water Meridian
First Meridian:
Earth meridian

Meridians And The Human System Flow Chart


Solar Meridian


  • Meridian: Solar
  • Element: Cosmic Fire (Solar)
  • Auric Layer: Ketheric Template Level
  • Chakra: Crown Charka
  • Sense: Seven Sense
  • Organs: Unknown
                                  
Lunar Meridian
  • Meridian: Lunar
  • Element: Telepathic Energy (plasma- Lunar)
  • Auric Layer: Celestial Body
  • Chakra: Anja / minds eye
  • Sense: eye Thought
  • Organs: Unknown
                             Moon Symbol

Cosmic Meridians

The cosmic meridians of both the solar and lunar houses both influence the five meridian energies of the earth the solar meridian is the light at the centre of our solar system it gives us all light and warmth as we orbit around the solar meridian the seasons change and so does the level of energy that flows to us from the solar meridian.

The solar meridian energy flows through the crown chakra and down the spinal cord and flows through the meridian organs of the body. This promotes good heath in the physical and spiritual bodies. This brings balance of both mind and body as we move towards enlightenment it is the light of the first cosmic ray of the solar house that aligns us to the truth of who we are.

The spiritual aspect of the humanity flows forth from the very essence of our existence. For if we look with ourselves are we not all the light being of meridian earth.

The lunar meridian brings balance and ceremonial order to the spiritual enlightenment of the wingmaker. The lunar meridian energies flow through the sixth chakra at the base of the skull,at the medula oblongata. It's location is at the front of the head is between the eyebrows at the third eye. the third eyes brings cleansing, clairvouance, healing, truth seeking and draws Lunar energy in to the body.



Ether Meridian


  • Meridian: Ether 
  • Element: Metal or Ether Meridian 
  • Auric Layer: Etheric Template Level 
  • Chakra: Throat Charka 
  • Sense: Hearing 
  • Organs:
  • Lung: Metal Energy-Yin Organ
  • Large Intestine: Metal Energy-Yang Organ  
spirit symbol
Directions

Wood Meridian


  • Meridian: Wood 
  • Element: Air 
  • Auric Layer: Astral Body 
  • Chakra: Heart Charka 
  • Sense: Touch 
  • Organs:
  • Gallbladder: Wood Energy-Yang Organ         
  • Liver: Wood Energy-Yin Organ
Air Element

Fire Meridian


  • Meridian: Fire 
  • Element: Fire 
  • Auric Layer: Mental Body 
  • Chakra: Solar Plexus 
  • Sense: Sight 
  • Organs:
  • Heart: Fire Energy-Yin Organ
  • Small Intestine: Fire Energy-Yang Organ     
  • Pericardium: Fire Energy-Yin Organ
  • Triple Burner: Fire Energy-Yang Organ
fire element

Water Meridian


  • Meridian: Water 
  • Element: Water 
  • Auric Layer: Emotional Body 
  • Chakra: Sacral Charka 
  • Sense: Taste 
  • Organs
  • :Bladder: Water Energy-Yang Organ           
  • Kidney: Water Energy-Yin Organ
Water Element

Earth Meridian



  • Meridian: Earth 
  • Element: Earth 
  • Auric Layer: Etheric Body 
  • Chakra: Base Charka 
  • Sense: Smell 
  • Organs: 
  • Stomach: Earth Energy-Yang Organ            
  • Spleen: Earth Energy-Yin Organ
Earth Symbol




Organs Of The Ether Meridian


Lung: Metal-energy yin organ

Known as the 'Prime Minister', the lungs control breath and energy and assist the 'King' heart with the circulation of blood. The Internal Medicine Classic states: 'Energy is the commander of blood; when energy moves, blood follows. Blood is the mother of energy; where blood goes, energy follows.' This intimate relationship between breath and pulse, blood and energy, is the basis of Chinese breathing exercises.

Breathing controls cellular respiration, and shallow irregular breathing is therefore a major cause of low vitality and insufficient metabolism. The lungs also control the skin, which 'breathes' via the opening and closing of pores and is responsible for adjusting body temperature through perspiration and shivering.


The skin is where the radiant energy of resistance emanates, forming the first line of defense against noxious environmental energies such as heat and cold. Flu and the common cold are caused by impairment of radiant skin energy's capacity to resist external invasion, and symptoms of these diseases usually settle in the lungs and bronchial tract.

Pallid skin and poor complexion are common indications of weak lungs. The nose is the external aperture of the lungs and the gate of breath. A clogged or runny nose is another indicator of ailing lungs.

Breathing directly controls the autonomous nervous system, and this relationship is the basis for almost every system of yoga and meditation. By regulating the autonomous nervous system and governing energy and pulse, breathing forms a direct bridge between body and mind and may be utilized to keep the two in balance.

  • Lung

  • Paired Organ : Large Intestine
  • Color : pure white
  • Peak Hours : 3am-5am
  • Physical Branches : nose, skin, body hair, mucus
  • Functions : accepts pure fluids from spleen, which are then mixed with air, and circulated through the meridians, circulates Wei Qi
Looking at the branches of a tree it can be seen that each larger branch splits in two. Each smaller branch then splits in two, and so and so on until the branches become leaves. Each leaf, then, begins with a single vein, then splits, by two, into smaller and smaller veins, until they reach the individual cells are exposed to the air. 

This is the same way the lungs are formed. Even more interesting is the relationship between trees and humans. Plants breathe in CO2 and breathe out O2, while humans and animals breathe in O2 and breathe out CO2. Thus trees can be considered, the lungs of the earth.


Lungs: Psycho-Emotional Aspects
  • It is said that the Lungs are "the priest" or The Minister of Heaven and are responsible for establishing the foundation of Qi for the entire body.
  • The Lungs house the body's Seven Corporeal Souls (Po) and are responsible for self-protection and self-preservation.

  • The Lungs positive psycho-emotional attributes are righteousness, dignity, integrity, and high self-esteem; 
  • their negative attributes are disappointment, sadness, grief, despair, anxiety, shame, and sorrow
The Lung Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories

The lung channel begins deep in the solar plexus region (middle burner) and descends to meet the large intestine. Winding up past the stomach, it crosses the diaphragm, divides, and enters the lungs. It then re-unites, passes up the middle of the windpipe to the throat and divides again, surfacing in the hollow region near the front of the shoulder (LU-1). 




From here it passes over the shoulder and down the anterior (front) aspect of the arm along the outer border of the biceps muscle. It reaches the outside of the biceps tendon in the elbow crease (LU-5), and continues down the forearm to the wrist just above the base of the thumb (LU-9). The channel crosses the height of the thumb muscle to finish at the corner of the thumbnail


lung

Internal Trajectories of the Lung Meridian

The Ling Shu describes the internal trajectories of the lung meridian thus:

The vessel of the lungs, hand tai yin, starts at the middle warmer. It comes down and then spirally wraps the large intestine. It then returns to and circles the entrance of the stomach, coming up, and permeates the lungs, then going to and coming out at the sides.


lung

We may interpret this description in the following manner: The starting place is seen as CV-12 (middle of the stomach): from here it passes to CV-10 (exit of the stomach), then up to CV-13 (entrance of the stomach) then down to CV-9 (dividing place of water).

Next it transverses the lower part of the large intestine, by way of the greater omentum or possibly the mesenterial folds, following the length of the large intestine and spirally wrapping it until it reaches the rectum. From here it returns to CV-13, then passes up to the lungs, permeating the lungs. 



It then follows the 'supporter of the lungs, the bronchii and trachea, to pass out to the surface at LU-1".
We can also view the first stages of the meridian as a spiral from a three-dimensional perspective:


Large intestine: Metal-energy yang organ

The large intestine is called the 'Minister of Transportation'. It controls the transformation of digestive wastes from liquid to solid state and transports the solids onwards and outwards for excretion through the rectum. It plays a major role in the balance and purity of bodily fluids and assists the lungs in controlling the skin's pores and perspiration.

Coupled with the lungs by Metal energy, the large intestine depends on the lungs for movement via the expansion and contraction of the diaphragm, which works like a pump to give impetus to peristalsis by regulating abdominal pressure.

Thus sluggish bowels may be stimulated and constipation cured by deep diaphragmic breathing and by tonifying lung energy. Conversely, congested lungs and clogged bronchial passages may be cleared by purging the bowels.

  • Large Intestine

  • Paired Organ: Lungs
  • Color: off-white
  • Peak Hours: 5am-7am
  • Physical Branches: nose, skin, body hair, mucus
  • Functions: absorption of fluids, elimination of solid wastes

Large Intestine: Psycho-Emotional Aspects


  • The Large Intestine relationship to the Lungs makes it equally affected by the emotions of sadness, grief, and worry.  
  • An energetic imbalance in the Large Intestine can result in physical weakness and provoke emotional introversion, accompanied by feelings of depression, irritability, discouragement, distress and apathy. 
  • Strong emotions of fear or panic can produce an energetic-stool reflex reaction in the Large Intestine resulting in a spontaneous defecation.
The Large Intestine Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points,and Internal TrajectoriesThe large intestine channel begins by the outside corner of the index fingernail. It runs along the edge of the finger, between the two tendons of the thumb at the wrist joint (LI-5) and along the bony margin of the outer edge of the arm (the radius bone) to the elbow.

The point LI-11 is situated at the outside of the elbow crease, which is visible when the arm is bent. From here the channel continues to the point LI-15 on the outside of the shoulder muscle. It then crosses the shoulder blade and meets the governing vessel below the 7th cervical vertebrae at point GV-14.

It descends internally to connect first with the lung and then the large intestine. From the shoulder a branch travels upward over the muscle at the side of the neck (sterno-cleido-mastoid) to the cheek, passing through the lower gums, then over the top lip. It terminates beside the opposite nostril, where it links to the stomach channel.

Internal Trajectories of the Large Intestine Meridian


intestine

The Ling Shu describes the internal trajectories of the Large Intestine meridian thus: It comes into ST-12, down to and spirally wrapping the lungs, then down to the diaphragm, and then permeates the large intestine.

We may interpret this description in the following manner: From ST-12 the trajectory passes to and spirally wraps the lungs; then, following the aorta, it passes downward through the diaphragm. Here it splits to permeate the large intestine. Several commentators, including Hua Shuo, think that this trajectory involves ST-25.


Excercise for strengthening Vishuddha Chakra - Throat


Cobra

1. Lie prone on the floor. Stretch your legs back, tops of the feet on the floor. Spread your hands on the floor under your shoulders. Hug the elbows back into your body.2. Press the tops of the feet and thighs and the pubis firmly into the floor.3. On an inhalation, begin to straighten the arms to lift the chest off the floor, going only to the height at which you can maintain a connection through your pubis to your legs. Press the tailbone toward the pubis and lift the pubis toward the navel. Narrow the hip points. Firm but don't harden the buttocks.4. Firm the shoulder blades against the back, puffing the side ribs forward. Lift through the top of the sternum but avoid pushing the front ribs forward, which only hardens the lower back. Distribute the backbend evenly throughout the entire spine.5. Hold the pose anywhere from 15 to 30 seconds, breathing easily. Release back to the floor with an exhalation.

Fish Pose


The fish pose is the natural successor of the shoulder stand and should be used as a counter pose to the stand. The pose implies a compression of the spine and neck to counter the stretch obtained while in the shoulder stand or Bridge and Plough poses.
There are several benefits of this pose. It helps expand the chest cavity, allowing the lungs to take in more air and to become more accustomed to deep breathing techniques. It also strengthens the neck muscles, makes the nerves more responsive and increases spinal flexibility.
To execute this pose lie on the floor with the back and legs straight and close together. The spine should be straight and parallel to the floor. The arms should be straight, position under the thighs. The palms should be together, stuck to the floor while the elbows are as close to one another as possible. 
Press the elbows onto the floor and arch the back while inhaling deeply. Keep the weight of the body on the elbows and move the head back until it reaches the floor. Exhale while holding this pose. Relax the legs and allow the chest to expand while inhaling deeply. To come out of the pose slowly lift the head and then release the pressure from the elbows.

Shoulder Stand


This pose is very popular with yoga practitioners and is considered one of the best yoga asanas. However, to properly execute this pose deep breathing must be used otherwise it will be little more than an acrobatic looking position. This pose was adopted by gymnasiums and sports training facilities and can be performed by both men and women with maximum efficiency. 
The pose begins by lying on the back. The legs should be straight and close together, while the arms are parallel to the torso. Next raise the legs towards the ceiling, and point the toes upward. Allow the weight of the body to rest on the neck muscles and the deltoid muscles of the shoulders. Support the back and legs into the vertical position by allowing the hands to give the lower back the balance it needs. Breathe deeply while going into the pose. 
The pose should be held with the legs and spine straight. Breathe slowly and deeply while concentrating on the thyroid gland which is located in the neck. The shoulder stand has profound effects on this gland and increases its tone. Hold this pose for a couple of minutes for the best effects. 
To come out of the pose curve the back and knees simultaneously and lower them to the ground. Remove the hands and place them flat on the floor. When the back is flat on the floor straighten the knees and lower the legs gently.

Organs Of The Nature Meridian


Gallbladder: Wood-energy yang organ

Known as the 'Honorable Minister', the gall bladder is in charge of the 'Central Clearing Department'. It secretes the pure and potent bile fluids required to digest and metabolize fats and oils, and its energy provides muscular strength and vitality.

It works with the lymphatic system to clear toxic by-products of metabolism from the muscular system, thereby eliminating muscular aches and fatigue. In the Chinese system, the common tension headache is caused by obstruction in the gall-bladder meridian, which runs up over the shoulders and back of the neck to the top of the head and forehead. Hence such headaches are usually accompanied by neck and shoulder tension.


The gall bladder governs daring and decisiveness. In Chinese, the word for 'daring' is da dan ('big gall'). The English language also acknowledges this psychophysiological relationship with the phrase 'a lot of gall'. An old Chinese adage states: 'The gall bladder is daring, the heart is careful', which reflects the stimulating generative influence of Wood to Fire.

Gallbladder


  • Paired Organ : Liver
  • Color : yellow green
  • Peak Hours : 11pm-1am
  • Mental Qualities : resentment
  • Physical Branches : eyes, tendons, tears, nails
  • Functions : stores and excretes bile, one of the Six Extraordinary Organs

Gall Bladder: Psycho-Emotional Aspects


  • The Gall Bladder is responsible for making decisions and judgments, as well as providing courage and initiative. This organ is sometimes called the Court of Justice or The General's Advisor. 
  • Although the Kidneys control drive and vitality, the Gall Bladder provides the capacity to turn this drive and vitality into decisive action.
  • The Gall Bladder has an influence on the quality and length of sleep. 
  • If the Gall Bladder is Deficient, the patient will often wake up suddenly, very early in the morning, and be unable to fall asleep again. 
  • Patient's who are timid, indecisive, and easily discouraged by slight adversity, are said to have a weak Gall Bladder; conversely, decisive and determined patients are said to have a strong Gall Bladder.
The Gallbladder Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories

This channel begins just outside the outer corner of the eye, loops down and up to the forehead just within the hair line, and descends behind the ear to the corner of the skull. It then returns to the forehead above the center of the eye and contours the head to the bottom of the skull at GB-20. 

It continues down the neck behind the shoulder to connect with the governing vessel at GV-14, then crosses over the shoulder. The channel descends the side of the body along the rib margin to the waist and pelvic crest before going deeper to meet the bladder channel at the sacrum. 

At GB-30 it re-emerges and continues down the outside of the leg, in front of the ankle, ending on the outside of the 4th toe. Internal branches connect with the stomach channel (on the jaw) and the small intestine channel, and join the liver and gallbladder organs.


Internal Trajectories of the Gallbladder Meridian

Having come down from the head, a trajectory passes to ST-12.[Thence] it passes to the inside of the chest and then down. It passes through the diaphragm, spirally wraps the liver and permeates the gallbladder. Then it circles round the inside lining of the ribs and the side of the body and comes down to ST-30


In this case, "the inside of the chest" is seen as the sides of the chest, around PC-1. In general, we should be aware that the inside of the chest has a wider meaning which depends on context. It can be inside the chest, CV-17, the sides of the chest, as well as some other less common referents. 


In coming down through the diaphragm it probably passes through the esophagus and then the stomach, before it passes to and spirally wraps the liver. After this, it permeates the gallbladder. In circling around on the inside of the lining of the ribs and the sides of the body it passes out to LV-13, and then to ST-30.

Liver: Wood-energy yin organ

The liver is called the 'General' or 'Chief of Staff' and is responsible for filtering, detoxifying, nourishing, replenishing, and storing blood. The liver stores large amounts of sugar in the form of glycogen, which it releases into the blood stream as glucose whenever the body requires extra infusions of metabolic energy. 

The liver receives all amino acids extracted from food by the small intestine and recombines them to synthesize the various forms of protein required for growth and repair of bodily tissues.

The liver controls the peripheral nervous system, which regulates muscular activity and tension. The inability to relax is often caused by liver dysfunction or imbalance in Wood energy. Liver energy also controls ligaments and tendons, which together with muscles regulate motor activity and determine physical coordination. 


Liver function is reflected externally in the condition of finger- and toenails and by the eyes and vision. Blurry vision is often a result of liver malfunction rather than an eye problem, and even Western medicine recognizes the symptomatic yellow eyes of liver jaundice.



Through its association with Wood energy, the liver governs growth and development, drive and desires, ambitions and creativity. Obstruction of liver energy can cause intense feelings of frustration, rage, and anger, and these emotions in turn further disrupt liver energy and suppress liver function, in a vicious self-destructive cycle.

Liver


  • Paired Organ : Gallbladder
  • Color : deep green
  • Peak Hours : 1am-3am
  • Physical Branches : eyes, tendons, tears, nails
  • Functions : stores the blood, governs the free flow of qi

Liver: Psycho-Emotional Aspects


  • The Liver is responsible for planning and creativity, as well as instantaneous solutions or sudden insights; it is therefore considered The General in Charge of Strategy.
  • The Liver houses the body's Hun and governs fright. Its positive psycho-emotional attributes are kindness, benevolence, compassion, and generosity; its negative attributes are anger, irritability, frustration, resentment, jealousy, rage, and depression.
  • The Liver is also called the "root of resistance to fatigue." Whenever the Liver is not functioning properly (stagnate or excessively Hot due to suppressed emotions) the patient can experience fatigue as well as physical weakness.

The Liver Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories

Beginning by the inside of the big toenail, the liver channel crosses the top of the foot, passes in front of the inside ankle and up the inner aspect of the leg through SP-6 close behind the edge of the bone. It continues past the knee along the inner thigh to the groin and pubic region, where it circulates the external genitals. 

It connects with the conception vessel in the lower abdomen and continues up around the stomach to enter both the liver and gallbladder. Connecting with two surface points on the ribs, the channel then dips into the ribcage, runs up through the throat, opening to the eye, and ends at the crown of the head where it connects with the governing vessel. 

A branch circles the mouth. From within the liver, another internal branch reaches the lungs, and this restarts the cycle of qi.

Internal Trajectories of the Liver Meridian

The liver meridian rises up the medial sides of the legs from the big toes.
[It then] comes into the yin organs [sexual organs] and circles around the yin organs. Then it passes through the small abdomen; then up to and surrounding the stomach; then it permeates the liver. and spirally wraps the gallbladder. It comes up and passes through the diaphragm, up the sides of the ribs, up behind the trachea, to behind the throat. 



Then it rises up the cheeks, comes into the eyes, passes up the forehead and meets the du mai at the top of the head. . . . A branch separates from the liver, passes up through the diaphragm and goes to the lungs.


In this case, "the inside of the chest" is seen as the sides of the chest, around PC-1. In general, we should be aware that the inside of the chest has a wider meaning which depends on context. It can be inside the chest, CV-17, the sides of the chest, as well as some other less common referents. In coming down through the diaphragm it probably passes through the esophagus and then the stomach, before it passes to and spirally wraps the liver. 


After this, it permeates the gallbladder. In circling around on the inside of the lining of the ribs and the sides of the body it passes out to LV-13, and then to ST-30.

After circling around the sexual organs it passes into the small abdomen, the kidney reflex area, and an area below the umbilicus described by or including CV-2, CV-3, CV-4. Then it passes up to and surrounds the stomach, permeates the liver, and spirally wraps the gallbladder. When it passes up and out to the sides, it surfaces at LV-13 and re-enters internally at LV-14.


The trajectory that passes up to and meets the du mai (governing vessel) joins at GV-20. The branch passes up to the lungs, then comes down to the middles warmer and "surrounds CV-12". Once at CV-12, the cycle of the twelve meridians is ready to start again, as the lung meridian has its origin at CV-12. 


This interpretation if the meridians beginning at CV-12 and ending at CV-12 so that they make a complete circuit is one that comes from the Shisi Jing Fa Hui.


The Ling Shu contains another very different idea about the pathways of the liver meridian which also brings it back full circle to the lung meridian. This interpretation is particularly interesting in that the trajectory includes the du mai and passes up the abdomen to enter the chest at ST-21.



The liver meridian passes up to the liver. [From the liver] it passes up through to the lungs, rises up to the throat, to the nasal pharynx, to the nose. A branch splits and rises to the top of the forehead, to the top of the head. It then goes down around the spine into the sacrum-coccyx; this is the du mai. [It passes inside and] spirally wraps the yin organs. 


It passes up to the lining of the abdomen, enters at ST-12, passes down into the lungs and comes out at tai yin [the lung meridian].


This trajectory is paralleled in complexity only by the kidney meridian, and seems to be even more inclusive, as the du mai is seen as its branch. It is seen to spirally wrap all the yin organs. It definitely provides an alternate route by which the qi passes from the liver to the lung meridian to complete the circuit. 


Whichever interpretation we accept, we can see that the internal connections of the meridians play an important role in the circulation of the qi through the twelve meridians, beginning at CV-12 and ending at CV-12, or beginning and ending at the lung meridian ready to circle again.


According to the Chinese, the liver 'stores the blood' and is associated with Wood energy, which is an upward moving force. This relates very much with Western physiology, as just about all the veins of the gastrointestinal tract flow into the liver via the Hepatic Portal vein. From there the blood flows 'upwards' through the liver into the Inferior Vena Cava. Here's a schematic of the Hepatic Portal system:


Excercise for strengthening Anahata Chakra - Heart


Cobra


1. Lie prone on the floor. Stretch your legs back, tops of the feet on the floor. Spread your hands on the floor under your shoulders. Hug the elbows back into your body.
2. Press the tops of the feet and thighs and the pubis firmly into the floor.
3. On an inhalation, begin to straighten the arms to lift the chest off the floor, going only to the height at which you can maintain a connection through your pubis to your legs. Press the tailbone toward the pubis and lift the pubis toward the navel. Narrow the hip points. Firm but don't harden the buttocks.
4. Firm the shoulder blades against the back, puffing the side ribs forward. Lift through the top of the sternum but avoid pushing the front ribs forward, which only hardens the lower back. Distribute the backbend evenly throughout the entire spine.
5. Hold the pose anywhere from 15 to 30 seconds, breathing easily. Release back to the floor with an exhalation.

Fish Pose


The fish pose is the natural successor of the shoulder stand and should be used as a counter pose to the stand. The pose implies a compression of the spine and neck to counter the stretch obtained while in the shoulder stand or Bridge and Plough poses.

There are several benefits of this pose. It helps expand the chest cavity, allowing the lungs to take in more air and to become more accustomed to deep breathing techniques. It also strengthens the neck muscles, makes the nerves more responsive and increases spinal flexibility.

To execute this pose lie on the floor with the back and legs straight and close together. The spine should be straight and parallel to the floor. The arms should be straight, position under the thighs. The palms should be together, stuck to the floor while the elbows are as close to one another as possible.


Press the elbows onto the floor and arch the back while inhaling deeply. Keep the weight of the body on the elbows and move the head back until it reaches the floor. Exhale while holding this pose. Relax the legs and allow the chest to expand while inhaling deeply. To come out of the pose slowly lift the head and then release the pressure from the elbows.

Bow Pose

The Bow Pose is executed by raising both halves of the body simultaneously, through a combination of other yoga poses. 

The hands and arms are used to pull the trunk and legs up together to form a curve. This movement tones the back muscles and contributes to increasing the elasticity of the spine and increasing vitality and improving posture. 

This Pose balances the weight of the body on the abdomen, reducing abdominal fat. It also provides a powerful massage for the internal organs.

In order to execute this pose lie down comfortably on the front of the body, keeping the head down. While inhaling bring the knees up and reach back to hold the ankles. 

While in this position exhale and then continue by inhaling while raising the head and chest and pulling the ankles up by lifting both the thighs and knees off the floor. 

While arching backwards continue to look up. Maintain the position and take three slow, deep breaths and then exhale and release the ankles.

To execute the Rocking Bow Pose, come into the Bow position and gradually rock forward and back. It is recommended to exhale while rocking forward and to inhale while rocking back. 

The head should remain in the static position while proceeding with the Rocking Bow Pose and should always be looking up. Repeat this rocking up to ten times and then completely relax the body.

Shoulder Stand

This pose is very popular with yoga practitioners and is considered one of the best yoga asanas. However, to properly execute this pose deep breathing must be used otherwise it will be little more than an acrobatic looking position. 

This pose was adopted by gymnasiums and sports training facilities and can be performed by both men and women with maximum efficiency.

The pose begins by lying on the back. The legs should be straight and close together, while the arms are parallel to the torso. Next raise the legs towards the ceiling, and point the toes upward. 

Allow the weight of the body to rest on the neck muscles and the deltoid muscles of the shoulders. Support the back and legs into the vertical position by allowing the hands to give the lower back the balance it needs. Breathe deeply while going into the pose.

The pose should be held with the legs and spine straight. Breathe slowly and deeply while concentrating on the thyroid gland which is located in the neck. 

The shoulder stand has profound effects on this gland and increases its tone. Hold this pose for a couple of minutes for the best effects.

To come out of the pose curve the back and knees simultaneously and lower them to the ground. Remove the hands and place them flat on the floor. When the back is flat on the floor straighten the knees and lower the legs gently.

Heart: Fire energy yin organ

The heart is called the 'King' of the organs. The Internal Medicine Classic states: 'The heart commands all of the organs and viscera, houses the spirit, and controls the emotions.' In Chinese, the word for 'heart' (shin) is also used to denote 'mind'
  • When the heart is strong and steady, it controls the emotions; when it is weak and wavering, the emotions rebel and prey upon the heart mind, which then loses its command over the body.
  • Physiologically, the heart controls the circulation and distribution of blood, and therefore all the other organs depend upon it for sustenance. 
  • Thoughts and emotions influence the function of various organs via pulse and blood pressure, which are controlled by the heart, where emotions arise.
  • Internally, the heart is functionally associated with the thymus gland, which is located in the same cavity and forms a mainstay of the immune system. 
  • Extreme emotions such as grief and anger have an immediate suppressive effect on the immune system by inhibiting thymus function, a phenomenon that has long been observed but little understood in Western medicine.
  • Externally, the heart is related to the tongue, to which it is connected by the heart muscle. The color and texture of the tongue thus reflect the condition of the heart. 
  • Speech impediments such as stuttering and mutism are often caused by dysfunction or imbalance in heart energy. Facial complexion, which is a direct reflection of blood circulation, is also a major external indicator of heart function. 
  • Fire energy makes the heart the dominant organ of summer, during which season the heart must increase circulation to the surface in order to dissipate excess body heat.
Heart/Mind


  • Paired Organ: Small Intestine
  • Color: red with slight blue tint
  • Peak Hours: 11am-1pm
  • Physical Branches: blood, tongue, throat, sweat, facial complexion, adrenals, thyroid, prostate, pituitary
  • Functions: pulse/circulation, house of the spirit

Heart: Psycho Emotional Aspects


  • The Heart's associated organ is the Small Intestine; its element is Fire. 
  • Long-term memory, thinking, emotions, intimacy, cognition, intelligence, and ideas are all dominated by the function of the Heart. The Heart is sometimes called The Emperor, or "supreme controller of all Yin and Yang organs". The Heart houses the body's spirit (Shen).
  • The Heart dominates sleep; if the Heart is strong the patient will fall asleep easily and sleep soundly. If the Heart is weak, the patient's mind will "float," resulting in an inability to fall asleep, disturbed sleep, or excessive dreaming. 
  • The Heart's positive psycho emotional attributes are love, joy, peace, contentment, propriety, insight, wisdom, orderliness, forgiveness, and courtesy. Its negative attributes are hate, guilt, shock, nervousness, excitement, longing, and craving.
  • It is only recently that the intelligence system of the heart has been discovered. The heart is not just a pumping machine. It is an intelligence system. It is in fact the most intelligent system of all our brains, with its own receptors, its own electromagnetic force, from 45 to 70 times more powerful than the brains of the neocortex, and the only force capable of changing our own DNA.
  • It can turn the mortal into immortal, glial cells into heart cells, mortal center into immortal walls in any cell. It is in fact he heart that turns each one of us from dead into living cells. No one of us is human until the heart beats. 
And vice versa, that first beat of the heart is what makes us human. 
In summary we can affirm the following:  
a) The heart contains its own nervous system and nerve ganglia that process information and send it to the neocortex.  
b) Th heart is a hormonal gland producing its own neurotransmitters, dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrin, the catechlomines, which affect the kidneys, the adrenal gland, the circulatory system and the neocortex.  
c) The heart generates from 45 to 60 times more amplitude electrically than what we call the brain, plus all emotions alter the heart's electrical field.  
d) Electricity emanating from the heart of person A can be detected and measured in the brain waves of persons near or touching person A.  
e) Cellular memory resides in the heart cells, as can be seen from transplant cases.  
f) DNA can be altered in the hands of a person practicing head/heart "entrainment," or what we know as yoga.
The second beat, and the first in what will determine our identity, is the amygdala. The amygdala starts forming immediately after the heart's first beat. It stores all the memories of our life in the womb, with the placenta, the water, the fluids of life and the terror of losing them, and also the joy of being fed, of bouncing, of moving. But the amygdala stores also the life of the mother, her depressions, her fears, her life.

And this accumulation of memories goes on in us till the age of three. Which means that all this time we have lived, our life has been recorded for us in the amydgala. 

After the age of three the hippocampus matures in us. In it conscious memories are stored and we have access to them However, the hippo campus, we, have no access to the memories and the life we lived in the amygdala of the previous three years, even if from this point on amygdala and hippo campus converse with each other ( Carter, Rita, 1998).

What happens to the memories of the amygdala? They become our individual nightmare, the invisible conditioning of all our actions, the blind spot of our lives, the origin of all our terrors, the unknown reason why we do what we done even when we do not know why we do it.

This is the reason why there is karma, and why we speak of previous lives, and we create, those vengeful gods waiting to destroy us around every corner, and the faces of the gods are so distorted and our bodies are paralyzed with fear and inaction. 

And this is why there is yoga. Can we destroy these nightmares to which we have no access to, can we change those distorted faces of the gods, can we dissolve our conditioning? The answer is, of course, yes, and the path is YOGA. And this, why?

Because the conditioning of the amygdala can only be removed by the intelligence system previous to it, and this is the heart, with its electromagnetic force and its power of transformation. Otherwise, the amygdala can act on its own by passing the intelligence centers of the neocortex. The gunas keep acting in spite of our good intentions.

We live in vain tied to the wheel of samsara.


The Heart Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories

This channel begins at the heart and emerges via the surrounding blood vessels to pass down through the diaphragm to the small intestine. Another internal branch extends through the throat to the eye, and a connecting channel goes to the tongue. 

A third branch goes first to the lung before surfacing at the center of the armpit. From here the channel descends along the inner aspect of the arm on the opposite side of the biceps to the lung channel, passing the inner end of the elbow crease. It continues down to the tip of the little finger by the corner of the nail on the thumb side.


Internal Trajectories of the Heart Meridian

The heart, hand shao yin vessel, starts at the center of the heart, comes out and permeates the supporter of the heart, goes down to and spirally wraps the small intestine. A branch following the supporter of the heart surrounds the throat and passes up to and makes contact with the supporter of the eye. The main meridian following the supporter of the heart goes up to the lungs, comes out below the armpit, and then starts at HT-1.

The heart meridian has its origin in the heart itself, but does not permeate the heart, rather it permeates the "supporter of the heart", probably the aorta and other major blood vessels entering and exiting the heart. Following the descending abdominal aorta, the descending part of the small intestine, spirally wrapping the small intestine. The branch that passes upwards, surrounding the throat, and going to the "supporter of the eyes" (the optic nerve), probably follows the blood vessels passing up into the head, i.e., the carotid artery. 

The main meridian passes from the "supporter of the heart," probably along the pulmonary artery, to the lungs and thence to the side of the body, exiting at HT-1. A passage from the Su Wen tells us how the heart and uterus are related:

When the menstruation doesn't come, it means that the blood vessel of the uterus is stagnant. The vessel of the uterus, belonging to the heart (meridian), spirally wraps the inside of the uterus. In this case, qi rises up and presses the lungs from the lower parts. The heart qi cannot pass down smoothly, therefore the menses do not come.

There are several important distinctions regarding the heart meridian trajectory. The heart meridian does not permeate the heart itself, rather it permeates the "supporter of the heart", which becomes the descending abdominal aorta. This vessel is palpable as the moving qi between the kidneys. The energetic consequences of this distinction are enormously important. We feel that this is making a very direct statement about the energetic nature of the heart, especially about the relation of the heart to the blood and to the Shen.

As we shall see later in this text this has a major influence on how we understand the nature of the source, the source qi, the moving qi between the kidneys, and ultimately the way in which the authors of the Ling Shu understood the origins of life. The relationship between the heart and the uterus is very significant. Some authors see the uterus as the place where the moving qi between the kidneys resides. 

This tends to reinforce the energetic connections that the heart has to this source. Further, it is the superficial trajectory of the supporter of the heart that is the main meridian. This is possibly one reason why many great practitioners have consistently refused to treat the heart meridian directly.

Small Intestine: Fire-energy yang organ

Known as the 'Minister of Reception', the small intestine receives partially digested food from the stomach and further refines it, separating 'the pure from the impure', then assimilating the purified nutrients and moving the impure wastes onwards to the large intestine for elimination. 

Associated with the heart by Fire energy, the small intestine controls the more basic emotions, as reflected in the Chinese term duan chang ('broken intestines'), which is equivalent to the English term 'broken heart'. Its energy meridian runs into the head, where it influences the function of the pituitary gland, the 'master gland' whose secretions regulate growth, metabolism, immunity, sexuality, and the entire endocrine system.

Small Intestine


  • Paired Organ: Heart
  • Color: pink
  • Peak Hours: 1pm-3pm
  • Physical Branches: blood, tongue, throat, sweat, facial complexion Functions: absorbs nutrients, digestion and elimination

Small Intestine: Psycho-Emotional Aspects


  • The Small Intestine influences the patient's mental clarity, judgment, and powers of discernment. The ability to distinguish relevant issues with clarity before making a decision is attributed to the Small Intestine.
The Small Intestine Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories

This channel starts on the other corner of the little fingernail from the heart channel and follows the edge of the hand to the wrist, where it turns slightly to flow up the forearm, close to the outer edge of the (ulna) bone. Passing the elbow at the "funny bone", it continues up the back of the arm, behind the shoulder joint.

It then curves across the shoulder blade to connect with the governing vessel at GV-14 as do all yang channels. It crosses forward to the hollow above the collarbone where the internal branch penetrates, first to the heart, then along the esophagus to the stomach, before connecting with its own organ, the small intestine.

From the collarbone region the superficial path continues up behind the muscle on the side of the neck (sterno-cleido-mastoid), then over the cheek to the ear. Two internal branches separate on the cheek. They lead to the gallbladder channel on the outer corner of the eye, and to the bladder channel at BL-1 on the inner corner.

Internal Trajectories of the Small Intestine Meridian

After rising up the arm from SI-1, a trajectory passes to ST-12: ...then it enters, ST-12, [passes down to] and spirally wraps the heart. It circles down and around the throat [and esophagus], passes through the diaphragm to the stomach, then permeates the small intestine. 

This trajectory is generally accepted and uncomplicated. The Lei Jing author comments that CV-10 is the "place of the small intestine". Thus, it may be reflective of the small intestine.

Pericardium: Fire-energy yin organ

Known as the 'King's Bodyguard', the pericardium is the heart's protective sack. Although it is not recognized as an organ in Western physiology, it is regarded in Chinese medicine as a Fire-energy organ whose special function is to protect the heart. 


Not only does the pericardium provide the heart with physical protection, its energy also protects the heart from damage and disruption by excessive emotional energies generated by the other organs, such as anger from the liver, fear from the kidneys, and grief from the lungs. In the Chinese system of health, extreme outbursts of the Seven Emotions are regarded as powerful disruptors of internal energy balance and major causes of disease. 


Without the pericardium to protect it, the heart would be subject to injury from the radical fluctuations in energy caused by every emotional up and down of the day.


The pericardium also helps regulate circulation in the major blood vessels that run in and out of the heart. Emotionally, pericardium energy is related to the loving feelings associated with sex, thereby linking the physical and emotional aspects of sexual activity. It does this by moderating the raw sexual energy of the kidneys with the all embracing love generated by the heart.

Pericardium


  • Paired Organ: Triple Burner
  • Color: purple red
  • Peak Hours: 7pm-9pm
  • Mental Qualities: love, sex
  • Physical Branches: blood, tongue, throat, sweat, facial complexion
  • Functions: protects the heart
Note: The Pericardium Meridian is also commonly referred to as the "Heart Constrictor" Meridian and the "Circulation-Sex" Meridian

Pericardium: Psycho-Emotional Aspects

The Pericardium has a powerful influence on the patient's mental and emotional states. Its goal is to "create feelings of joy and/or pleasure for the emperor (Heart)."

The Pericardium Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories

This channel begins in the middle of the chest at the pericardium. A branch descends internally through the diaphragm to the upper, middle, and lower burners. From the starting point a branch of the main channel crosses the chest to emerge just outside the nipple. It then ascends on the surface around the front of the armpit and flows down the arm, through the biceps muscle. 

At the elbow crease it passes just to the inside of the biceps tendon, then down the middle of the front of the forearm, between the heart and lung channels to the wrist. It crosses the middle of the palm to PC-8 where it divides. The main channel continues to the outer corner of the middle fingernail, and a connecting branch goes to the fourth finger to join the triple burner channel at TB-1.


Internal Trajectories of the Pericardium Meridian


The vessel of the master of the heart, hand jue yin, heart wrapping luo [pericardium], starts at the inside of the chest, comes out and permeates the heart-wrapping luo, passes down through the diaphragm, then timelessly spirals down through the triple warmers.

The "inside of the chest" is commonly viewed as CV-17. The internal trajectory starts at CV-17, then passes to the pericardium. From here it passes downwards, probably along the aorta or the esophagus, through the diaphragm, then "timelessly" spirally wraps the triple warmers.

The idea of timelessness offers fascinating insights into the nature of the triple warmers. The character we translate as timeless is li . This character has a number of different meanings, including "to pass through" and "successively."

Our selection of "timeless" is based on the Nan Jing and Zhuang Zi. We propose that this interpretation ameliorates commonly emphasizing the absolute energetic nature of these concepts. In a discussion relating to the reasons why there are five yin organs and six yang organs, the Nan Jing comments:

The triple burner has the function of dividing the source qi and controlling each of these qi. This has a name but no form. Another passage discusses the same problem: The master of the heart with the triple warmer are the outside and lining of the body. They have a name but they have no form

This idea of "no form", in this context, is usually seen to refer to the absence of a physical organ in the body for the set of functions which we identify as the triple warmer. It actually has much deeper implications than the absence of physical substance

The term "no form", wu xing, is used by Zhuang Zi. We feel that the Nan Jing references the idea of no form from Zhuang Zi.

Absolute jing has no form. The jing is tinier than the small [the concept of smallness]. Rough jing has form. No form means that it cannot be divided further.

The idea of no form does not simply refer to absence of material substance. It refers to the essential change of state between matter and energy, to the basic underlying substrate of material substance.

Much like the concept of the atom in pre-relativistic physics, or quarks and multidinous sub-atomic particles of current physics, it is the theoretical smallest particle of matter. The "absolute jing" is the precursor of matter or form. While it is always delightful to find an idea of such sophistication in an ancient medical text which Western scientific prejudice has overlooked, this is not such a rare idea.

Other classical texts have referred to the concept of no form in similar terms and we will meet this idea again in our studies. For now, however, the essential information that we must relate to the interior energetics from classical description is the sense that rather than the attachments of so many imaginary wires, the connections indicated are the confluence of quintessential forces.

What occurs at this intersection is not completely described by a terminology that allows us to think of the connection of simple electrical currents. It is more like the opposed coils of a generator or transformer where the currents create a change of state or a cyclotron where matter becomes energy.

While admitting that the "passing through" translation of the character li is sufficient for the description of the body's interior "wiring diagram," and certainly less subject to the criticism of orthodox translation, it lacks the recognition of the profound relativism of the classical idea of energy. It is not just that the trajectory of the pericardium intersects the triple warmer.

The pericardium and triple warmer intertwine and become identical. It is not just that both the triple warmer and pericardium have no material organ. Both are gateways to an energetic environment that is not limited by the boundaries of form. Space, matter, and time are not descriptions that suit the "tiny absolute jing." These are the dimensions of form, not the boundaries of energy.
We feel at least poetically justified to allow the concept of timelessness to indicate that this deep, interior connection represented for the classical authors a boundary where the particular human energies of the body meet and become the more absolute energies of cosmology

Regardless of our reader's willingness to accept our feelings that there is a tremendous relativism in the ideas, the fact remains that the master of the heart, the heart-wrapping luo (pericardium) is intimately connected to the triple warmer. It carries out similar functions. There are effectively three distinct aspects of this meridian. The first is the branch, arm jue yin, which emerges at PC-1 and passes down the arms to PC-9. The second is the heart-wrapping luo which is a trajectory that passes only around the heart, in normal usage, the pericardium. 

The third is the master of the heart. There are many places (for instance Ling Shu) where these three names are used in reference to the one meridian.

Diagrammatically these three aspects can be seen as follows: The master of the heart most logically relates to the aorta. It is an extension of the heart; branching from this is the heart-wrapping luo and the arm jue yin. That arm jue yin branches from the master of the heart is something we can derive by inference from an understanding of how the other meridians branch from their main pathways, and from the text of the Ling Shu:

The heart-wrapping luo is the vessel of the master of the heart. The master of the heart is likely the main pathway, with both arm jue yin and the heart-wrapping luo as branches.

The master of the heart carries out the functions of the shen; the heart stores the shen. The pericardium, heart-wrapping luo, functions to protect the heart from all types of disturbance. If the heart is injured, the shen will be disturbed and this will result in death or an incurable disease. The master of the heart functions energetically as a communicative pathway for the shen between the heart and the moving qi between the kidneys. In conceptualizing these pathways and functions, it is even possible to see this pathway as the meridian of the "small heart" or ming men:
The Su Wen says, "AT the sides of the seventh vertebra on the inside, is the small heart." Mr. Yang, the writer of the Tai Su, says, "There are twenty-one vertebrae in the person. Counting upwards from the lower parts, to the sides of the seventh vertebra, on the left is the kidney, on the right is ming men. Ming men is the small heart." The Nan Jing says, "The source of the heart comes out at PC-7; thus PC-7 belongs to arm jue yin. Wrapping-luo, helping fire, this is the meridian of the small heart."
This particular passage from Liu Wan Su gives us a significant description of the pericardium meridian, as it is commonly called, and its various internal trajectories. This significance will become clearer in later chapters. For now, however, we may expand our diagrammatic representation of the internal trajectories to the kidney (see last figure).

Triple burner: Fire-energy yang organ

This organ-energy system, which is not recognized in Western physiology, is called the 'Minister of Dykes and Dredges' and is responsible for the movement and transformation of various solids and fluids throughout the system, as well as for the production and circulation of nourishing energy (ying chee) and protective energy (wei chee). 

It is not a single self-contained organ, but rather a functional energy system involved in regulating the activities of other organs. It is composed of three parts, known as 'burners', each associated with one of the body's three main cavities: thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. 

An ancient Chinese medical text states: 'The Upper Burner controls intake, the Middle Burner controls transformation, the Lower Burner controls elimination.'

The Upper Burner runs from the base of the tongue to the entrance to the stomach and controls the intake of air, food, and fluids. It harmonizes the functions of heart and lungs, governs respiration, and regulates the distribution of protective energy to the body's external surfaces.

The Middle Burner runs from the entrance to the stomach down to its exit at the pyloric valve and controls digestion by harmonizing the functions of stomach, spleen, and pancreas. It is responsible for extracting nourishing energy from food and fluids and distributing it via the meridian system to the lungs and other parts of the body.

The Lower Burner runs from the pyloric valve down to the anus and urinary tract and is responsible for separating the pure from the impure products of digestion, absorbing nutrients, and eliminating solid and liquid wastes. It harmonizes the functions of liver, kidney, bladder, and large and small intestines and also regulates sexual and reproductive functions.

Some medical researchers believe that the Triple Burner is associated with the hypothalamus, the part of the brain which regulates appetite, digestion, fluid balance, body temperature, heartbeat, blood pressure, and other basic autonomous functions.

Triple burner


  • Paired Organ: Pericardium
  • Color: orange red
  • Peak Hours: 9pm-11pm
  • Physical Branches: blood, tongue, throat, sweat, facial complexion
  • Functions:regulates transformation and transportation of bodily fluids, and...
It's originally referred to as the 'Triple Burner', but 'Triple Warmer' and 'Triple Heater' are also commonly used.

Triple Burner: Psycho-Emotional Aspects

The Triple Burners are considered the Ambassadors or "intermediaries" for the body's Yuan (Original) Qi. On a psychological level, they can be used to move Qi and lift depression derived from stagnation of Liver Qi. When the Triple Burners, which regulate the consciousness, are full, the consciousness becomes stable and the Mind's intent is benevolent and kindhearted. 

The Triple Burners are also linked with the Heart and Pericardium and are affected by the emotion of joy. When the energy of the heart is strong and pure (without guilt), and the desires and thoughts of an individual are at peace, then the energy of the boy's sexual essence (Jing) will spread into the Triple Burners, and the Blood will flourish within the individual's vessels. 


If the "fire of desire" is allowed to Heat and combine with the energy of the Triple Burners, the energy of the individual's sexual essence will overflow, mixing itself with the energy of the Mingmen and will leave the body via the reproductive organs and tissues. This leads to Jing and Qi depletion.

The Triple Burner Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories


Beginning on the fourth (ring) finger, by the outside corner of the nail, the triple burner channel passes between the knuckles of the fourth and fifth fingers to the wrist. From here it ascends between the two bones of the forearm (radius and ulna), through the tip of the elbow, and up the back of the arm to the shoulder. Behind the top of the shoulder it joins the small intestine and the governing vessel channels. 

Then it rises over the shoulder to the collarbone region, descends internally to the pericardium in the upper burner, and then to the abdomen and the middle and lower burners. Re-emerging from the chest at the collarbone, the channel ascends the side of the neck and around the back of the ear. 


One branch rises internally to meet the gallbladder channel on the forehead, then descends to join the small intestine channel on the cheek. The superficial branch continues to the front of the ear and crosses to the outer corner of the eyebrow, where it joins the gallbladder channel again.


Internal Trajectories of the Triple Warmer Meridian

Having passed up the lateral aspect of the arm from the ring finger, the triple warmer meridian passes to ST-12: [It] comes in at ST-12, then passes down to CV-17, disperses [into the chest], and drops down into the pericardium. It then passes down through the diaphragm, circles down through and permeates the triple warmers. A branch starting at CV-17 passes back up to ST-12.



When the meridian "disperses" into the chest it is like a pervasive spray. The stream widens and becomes less dense, the picture is one of rain covering and moistening rather than a river passing through. Notice also that it does not spirally wrap the pericardium. Rather, it "drops down" as if it filtered through after dispersing from CV-17 into the chest.


This idea helps us see the relationship of the triple warmer to the breathing process. Perhaps this relationship to breath and the movement of breath downward to below the umbilicus is related to the action of "dispersion into the chest." Air is drawn into the lungs upon inhalation; once inside the lungs (inside the chest), it then mingles with the triple warmer pathway which is dispersing into the chest.

Then, it filters down to the the pericardium. From there it may circle downward through the triple warmers. This downward movement through the triple warmers may well be the means by which the qi of breathing arrives below the umbilicus where it is an important ingredient in the formation of the source qi and the nourishment of the source.

Excercise for strengthening Manipura

Breath of Fire


This is a rapid diaphragmatic breathing, designed to clean toxins from the body and stimulate Kundalini. Sit in an upright posture with back straight and legs relaxed. Using the muscles of your abdomen, SNAP in your diaphragm, causing a quick exhale to escape through your nose. Keep the mouth closed. By relaxing the abdomen, air will natually enter your nose and chest, causing an inhale. When this process is comfortable, repeat quickly, causing several quick, sequential exhales. Do in sets of fifty, with a long, deep breath at the end of each set. Three sets of 50 are usually a good place to start. After a while you can pace yourself according to what feels right.


Breath of Fire (Agni-Prasana)
A cleansing & energising breath, powered by abdominal contractions
 
Once the diaphragm is felt during Long Deep Breathing then there are a couple of ways in which one can begin to do Breath of Fire, where the air is pulled in and pumped out very rhythmically, just like pumping a bellows, without any tension being felt whatsoever on the abdominal muscles, chest and rib cage muscles or shoulders, which remain relaxes throughout the breath, so that it may almost seem that you can continue the rhythm indefinitely with little effort at all. 
One way to start Breath of Fire, which was the way I learned it some 30 years ago, is to start with long deep breathing, then as soon as the lungs are completely expanded, as described earlier, to immediately force the air out, and as soon as most of the air is out to immediately expand the air back in, each time arching the spine forwards and pressing the palms inward against the knees in a light manner to feel the diaphragm filling the lungs from the back to the front completely, then contracting again. 
With each breath one expands a bit faster and contracts a bit faster until without expanding or contracting completely, a rhythm is felt, and you let that rhythm take over. 
You might liken it to an old model locomotive where the wheels lurch forwards until some steam and speed is built up, then suddenly the train is moving forward almost effortlessly, with each breath like the chugging sound of the locomotive. 
The other way to get into the rhythm of the Breath of Fire for some, may be to immediately go to a powerful rhythmic breath, just by visualizing the bellows like nature of the diaphragm. 
Either way, from that point on you can make the Breath of Fire very powerful or very light. 
The Breath of Fire is not the same as Bastrika, which is a light fast rhythmic breath, usually taught as one of the pranayamas in hatha yoga. 
Nor is the Breath of Fire like Kabalabati, which is a forceful breath, where you contract the abdomen and rib cage (pulling on the root lock with each contacting breath), where the simple relaxing of the rib cage brings the air back into the lungs, without inhaling, and you force the air out again (also in a rhythmic manner). 
While Kapalabati is very powerful and beneficial, and while it is used in many KY Kriyas, it is not the same as Breath of Fire. 
Breath of Fire will entirely charge the nervous system, causing the glands to secrete and purify the blood. When it is done with certain postures and movements, which are meant to put contracting (drawing in) or expanding (releasing) pressure in nerve plexuses and glandular centers, those areas are made to fire and become completely charged. 
As an area becomes charged, the sexual (seminal) fluids are released into the bloodstream and flow to those charged areas, so that gradually those areas will maintain that charge and pranic pressure builds throughout the body converting Bindu (Tamasic and Rajasic energy) to Ojas (Satvic energy), which fills and permeates the entire body and mind. 
Bit by bit, over a period of just a few weeks of sets and kriyas combining posture, movement, breath, sound and locks, the entire body will begin to feel magnetically electric and etheric, as the field becomes balanced with an inward dynamo-like force. 
As this charge builds and polarizes, the mind becomes very still, very clear and bright, and a radiance is felt in and through and around the body and head. 
The feeling of the stressful need to think and act and to be the "doer" begin to recede, as the mind becomes more receptive and open to notice that there seems to be an almost automatic connectedness between one's aims and events and experiences that come to fulfill them. The feeling of a natural ever present oneness begins to emerge as a clearer always existing reality. 
Little by little, outward tendencies of the mind towards the physical and mental begin to fade, and one abides in one's satvic presence - spacelike, pervasive, without the sense of me or mine - the Self-Effulgent Heart, where  
"I AM" is the single Truth. 
The practice of Kundalini Yoga with the natural awareness and rhythm of the diaphragm in Long Deep Breathing and Breath of Fire allows the postures and kriyas to have the greatest and most complete effect in bringing the satvic field to the point where the Self recollects Itself and abides without attention in one's True Name - Sat Nam. 
Try these breaths out this way and see what happens.
Bow Pose Lie on your stomach, hands to the side and relax. Take a deep breath and bend yourknees while arching your back so that your hands grab onto your ankles. Let your hands do the work of maintaiining the arch while you rest your body as much as you can in this strange position. Breath deeply and let the breath rock you back and forth slightly. If you can hold this for a while (30 sec. to 2 mins.) you will feel an energizing of your solar plexus.


Pike Pose: Hard to maintain without practice, this little gem tightens tummy muscles and develops balance. From a position of resting on your back, bring your feet and legs up (knees as straight as possible) to make a V-shape with your torso. Hold as long as possible then relax.

Organs Of The Water Meridian


Bladder: Water-energy yang organ

The bladder is called the 'Minister of the Reservoir' and is responsible for storing and excreting the urinary waste fluids passed down from the kidneys. As an organ the bladder has only this function, but as an energy system the bladder is intimately related to the functions and balance of the autonomous nervous system. That's because the bladder energy meridian runs along the back of the body from head to heal, with two parallel branches flowing along each side of the spinal column.

These four branches of the bladder meridian exert a direct influence on the sympathetic and parasympathetic trunks of the autonomous nervous system, whose condition of modern life, over activates the sympathetic system, causing tension and pain along the spine and its periphery.

This tension and pain may be relieved by stimulating the flow of energy along the spinal branches of the bladder meridian. Such stimulation induces total relaxation by switching the autonomous nervous system over to the restful, restorative parasympathetic mode. Chinese massage therapy focuses primarily on these four spinal branches of the bladder meridian because of their direct influence over the autonomous nervous system, which regulates all the body's basic vital functions.

    Bladder
  • Paired Organ : Kidneys
  • Color : deep blue
  • Peak Hours : 3pm-5pm
  • Physical Branches : autonomous nervous system
  • Functions : stores and eliminates urine

Bladder: Psycho-Emotional Aspects


  • An imbalance in the Bladder can cause such psychological symptoms as habitual fear, lack of decision making capability and a diminished moral character. 
  • If the imbalance becomes chronic, it results in such emotional responses as jealousy, suspicion, and holding on to long-standing grudges.

The Bladder Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories

The bladder channel begins at the inner corner of the eye, rising up through the eyebrow (BL-2) over the forehead and skull to join the governing vessel at GV-20. Here it enters the brain, re-emerging as a superficial path at the nape of the neck. This path continues over the base of the skull (occiput), where it divides again into two branches that descend parallel with the spine.

The inner branch diverts briefly to meet GV-14 before continuing to the sacrum, then on down the back of the thigh to the center of the knee-fold. An internal branch connects with the kidney and then the bladder, after separating at the lumbar region. The outer branch passes from the occiput along the edge of the shoulder blade and descends to the buttock, continuing down the thigh to meet the other branch at the knee. The single channel continues down the center of the calf muscle and passes behind the outer ankle to the outer tip of the little toe.

Internal Trajectories of the Bladder Meridian

The vessel of the bladder, foot tai yang, starts at BL-1 and passes over the head. The main meridian is the first line on the back, the shu points line. It then: ...comes down the shu line to the lumbar area and goes into the body, spirally wraps the kidneys, then passes down to and permeates the bladder.


This quotation is usually understood to mean that after spirally wrapping the kidneys, the trajectory descends through or with the ureter to the bladder, to permeate the bladder. It is possible that in passing from the lumbar area to spirally wrap the kidneys it passes through the renal artery.


The Associated points, or Back-Shu points, are a set of points located along the bladder meridian running down the sides of the spine. These points are associated with each of the Twelve organs of the body, via the dorsal and ventral nerves coming out from the spine which supply those particular organs.

Kidney: Water-energy yin organ

Known as the 'Minister of Power', the kidney is regarded as the body's most important reservoir of essential energy. 


The original prenatal energy (yuan chee) which forms the basis of life is stored in the kidney organ-energy system, which is why the kidneys are also known as the 'Root of Life'

Kidney Cross Section 1In the Chinese view, the kidney organ system also includes the adrenal glands, which consist of the adrenal medulla and the adrenal cortex.

These glands sit like hats on top of the kidneys and secrete a wide range of essential hormones that regulate metabolism, excretion, immunity, sexual potency and fertility. 


Destruction of the adrenal cortex is fatal. 



The kidney system also includes what the Chinese call the 'external kidneys': the testicles in men and the ovaries in women. 


Thus the kidneys control sexual and reproductive functions and provide the body's prime source of sexual vitality, which the Chinese regard as a major indicator of health and immunity.


The kidneys themselves are responsible for filtering waste metabolites from the blood and moving them onwards to the bladder for excretion in urine. Along with the large intestine, the kidneys control the balance of fluids in the body. In addition, they regulate the body's acid-alkaline balance (pH) by selectively filtering out or retaining various minerals.


The kidneys, particularly the adrenal glands, are especially vulnerable to damage from excessive stress and sexual abuse. In the Chinese view, such damage is a major cause of immune deficiency, low vitality, and sexual impotence.


The kidneys control the growth and development of bones and nourish the marrow, which is the body's source of red and white blood cells. Weak kidney energy is therefore a prime cause of anemia and immune deficiency. The Chinese view the spinal cord and the brain as forms of marrow, and therefore poor memory, inability to think clearly, and backache are all regarded as indicators of impaired kidney function and deficient kidney energy.


Kidney vitality is reflected externally by the condition of head and body hair and is associated with the aperture of the ears. Tinnitus (ringing ears) is thus a sign of kidney dysfunction. The kidneys are the seat of courage and willpower, and therefore any impairment in kidney energy results in feelings of fear and paranoia. Intense fear can cause involuntary urination, a phenomenon also known to Western medicine.

  • Kidney

  • Paired Organ : Bladder
  • Color : light flame blue
  • Peak Hours : 5pm-7pm
  • Mental Qualities : fear, paranoia
  • Physical Branches : ears, bones, urine, head and pubic hair, brain, marrow
  • Functions : stores prenatal essence, filters the blood

Kidney: Psycho-Emotional Aspects

  • The Marrow produced from the Kidney Jing flows into the brain. The thinking ability is strengthened when Qi and Blood in the cerebral cortex are abundant. With the increase of thinking activity, a circle of light develops within the body's Taiji Pole.
  • The individual's innate intelligence (Yuan Shen) is represented by the intensity of light. The degree of accumulated spiritual energy is reflected by the number of light circles developed within the Taiji Pole.
  • These circles of light can be best observed when first waking. By placing slight pressure of the external eye lids the inner light of the Taiji Pole is projected onto the optic nerves, reflecting an image of the circle of light. If the circle of light is complete, it reflects a strong, healthy condition.
  • If the circle of light is dark within its center (similar to a doughnut), this reflects a Deficient condition. If the circle of light is broken or interrupted, it reflects an extreme Deficiency.
  • The "memory zone," as well as the "thought center" are also located in the cerebral cortex and will not develop until the Kidney Channels travel through the spine, along with the Liver Channels, to reach the cortex. When the Qi of these two channels is abundant, the memory function is keen.
  • The Kidneys house the body's will power (Zhi). They control short-term memory and store data. The Kidneys provide the capacity and drive for strength, skill and hard work. A patient with strong Kidneys can work hard and purposefully for long periods of time. 
  • Consequently, when the Kidneys are in a state of disharmony, the patient can sometimes be driven to a state of excessive-compulsive working habits (a workaholic). A patient with weak Kidneys will lack strength and endurance.
  • The Kidney's positive psycho-emotional attributes are wisdom, rationality, clear perception, gentleness, and self-understanding. The negative attributes are fear, loneliness, insecurity, and shock (which attacks the Heart first then descends into the Kidneys to become fear).

The Kidney Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories


This channel begins under the little toe, near the end of the bladder channel, and crosses through KD-1 to the inner edge of the foot. It loops behind the inside ankle bone to the heel, then rises along the inner aspect of the leg, intersecting the spleen channel at SP-6, before continuing up the calf and the inner thigh. Here its pathway becomes deeper and goes to the base of the spine, where it joins the governing vessel.

Rising internally in line with the lumbar spine it enters the kidney, descends to the bladder, and surfaces at the pubic area. It connects with the conception vessel in the lower abdomen and then rises over the body to the collarbone. Internally a branch leaves the kidney to enter the liver and lung, and continues up to the throat and tongue. From the lung another branch flows to the heart and chest and joins the pericardium channel.


Internal Trajectories of the Kidney Meridian

The kidney meridian begins below the small toe, then comes across the foot to the "heart of the sole" (near KI-1), then to KI-2, and up the leg along the kidney meridian pathway. At the thigh it goes interior:


[It] passes up the spine, permeates the kidneys, and spirally wraps the bladder.
According to most sources the kidney meridian has a complex series of trajectories. Once the meridian goes internal at the thigh, it passes to the spine at GV-1, then up the spine (an indefinite distance), back down the spine and out to KI-11. From KI-11 it superficially passes up to KI-16.

At KI-16 an internal trajectory circles backward between the skin and the peritoneum, almost following the dai mai (girdle vessel) trajectory. The meridian then enters and permeates the kidneys. Then, passing downward through the ureter to the bladder, it spirally wraps the bladder. This path also passes out to CV-3 and CV-4.




From KI-16 an external meridian passes up to KI-21. Here, another trajectory goes internally to and through the liver and up through the diaphragm into the lungs. There are two main interpretations of the trajectory after it reaches the lungs. The first posits that from the lungs the meridian passes along the pulmonary vein to the heart and spirally wraps the heart. It further travels to the "inside of the chest", usually seen as CV-17. CV-17 is the reflex point of the "inside of the chest" and may be a synonym for upper qi hai. 

A second interpretation proposes that the internal trajectory ends at the lungs and that from KI-21 the external meridian passes up to KI-25. From this point a trajectory passes inward to spirally wrap the heart and reach to the "inside of the chest", CV-17.

Since Yoshio Manaka's research suggests that KI-25 is a better reflex point, or mu point, for the heart than the traditional point, CV-14, the second interpretation would thus be better justified. Regardless of interpretation, it is interesting to note that the kidney meridian has a trajectory that spirally wraps the heart, an energetic connection usually reserved for the coupled yin-yang meridians. 

These kidney meridian deviations from the usual relationships have major energetic consequences and ramifications.

Excercise for strengthening Svadhisthana Chakra

Excercise for opening the second chakra involve working with movement in the hips and lower abdomen. Simple self-nurturing acivity, such as long, hot baths, showers or swimming should not be overlooked. Nurturing ourselves is the first step to receiving or giving nurturance to others.

The Goddess Pose 

Lie flat on your back and relax. Relax especially the legs, pelvis, and lower back. Bend your knees, bringing your feet in close to your buttocks. Slowly allow your knees to part, allowing the weight of the legs to stretch the inner thighs. Try to relax. 

Do not push your legs farther than is comfortable. Hold this position for two minutes or more. 

Then slowly bring your knees together again. This puts us in touch with our sexual vulnerability, which paradoxically must be understood before we can fully open ourselves up on this level.

Leg Lifts




This excercise helps move energy through the pelvis, often into the upper chakras. It is a classic Kundalini excercise, and a wonderful energizer.
  • Lie on your back and relax. 
  • Lift your legs six to 12 inches off the floor and spread them apart at this height. 
  • Bring together again and then kick our again. 
  • Rest after about five of these. 
  • Then bring your legs perpendicular to the floor and spread to each side. 
  • Bring together and down. 
  • Repeat until tired. 
  • Raising legs should be accompanied by an inhale, while lowering the legs should be accompanied by an exhale. 
This excercise is a strong Kundalini-raiser with powerful results. It is important not to strain and to avoid sore muscles. Stay in tune with the body.

Stomach Meridian: Earth-energy yang organ

The stomach is called the 'Minister of the Mill' and is also known as the 'Sea of Nourishment'. Because it is responsible for providing the entire system with postnatal energy from the digestion of food and fluids, it is regarded as the 'Root of Postnatal Life'. 

In addition to digesting bulk foods and fluids and moving them onwards to the small intestine for extraction and assimilation of nutrients, the stomach also extracts pure postnatal energy from foods and fluids, and in coordination with spleen energy it transports this food energy through the meridian system to the lungs, where it combines with air energy from breathing. 

This is a function of the stomach not acknowledged in Western medicine, which focuses only on the biochemistry of digestion and does not recognize the bioenergetic aspect.
Governed by pivotal Earth energy, the stomach is responsible for extracting and balancing all five elemental energies from foods and fluids ingested through the mouth, which it shares with the spleen as its external aperture. 

Any dysfunction of the stomach results in an immediate deficiency or imbalance in the nourishing energy channeled from the stomach to other organs.

  • Stomach Meridian

  • Paired Organ : Spleen
  • Color : deep yellow
  • Peak Hours : 7am-9am
  • Physical Branches : Muscles, lips, mouth, saliva Functions digestion : absorption of postnatal energy
  • Meridian energy : Earth
  • Chakra : First/ Base Chakra

Stomach: Psycho-Emotional Aspects

The Stomach influences the mental state; an Excess condition can agitate the mind and cause mental symptoms such as: mania or hypomania, confusion, severe anxiety, and hyperactivity.
The Stomach Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories.

Starting beside the nose, near LI-20, the stomach channel meets the bladder channel at point BL-1 on the forehead. From ST-1, just below the eye, it passes into the upper gums and around the mouth to link with the governing and conception vessels. Next, via the lower gums, it ascends in front of the ear to the forehead. From the jaw it descends alongside the throat to the collarbone region, where an internal branch descends to meet the stomach and spleen.

The superficial path continues down over the abdomen to the pubic area, where a second internal branch from the stomach rejoins it. The channel continues down the anterior thigh, passing just to the outside of the kneecap. At ST-36, below the knee, the channel divides again. 

The surface branch runs down the leg beside the shinbone, ending on the outside of the second toe. The deeper branch descends to the middle toe. From the top of the foot a connection runs to the spleen channel.


Internal Trajectories Of The Stomach Meridian

The Ling Shu tells us that at ST-12, the "main" meridian passes down along the chest and abdomen to ST-30, while the branch:
...passes down to the diaphragm (from ST-12), permeates the stomach, and spirally wraps the spleen. another branch starting at the exit of the stomach passes down through the lining of the abdomen to ST-30.

stomach
Most commentaries agree with this simple trajectory, the notable exception being the Lei Jing (The Classic of Categories), which tells us that the branch comes down through the lining of the abdomen to ST-30, comes down slightly lateral to the kidney meridian, starting at the same level as KI-16.

Spleen-Pancreas: Earth-Energy Yin Organ

In Chinese medicine, the function of the spleen organ-energy system includes the pancreas. Called the 'Minister of the Granary', the spleen and pancreas control extraction and assimilation of nutrients from food and fluids by providing the digestive enzymes and energy required by the stomach and small intestine. 

They regulate the quantity and quality of blood in circulation and coordinate with the kidneys to control fluid balance throughout the system. Spleen energy commands extraction of energy from stomach to lungs, where it is blended with energy from air to form True Human Energy. The spleen directly influences and is reflected by the tone and condition of muscle tissue. Weak limbs and muscular atrophy are indications of deficient spleen energy.

Spleen and pancreas condition is reflected externally by the color and tone of the lips: reddish moist lips indicate strong spleen function; pale dry lips are a sign of weak spleen function. The mouth is the spleen's external aperture, and temperamental moodiness is its associated emotion. The Chinese term for 'bad temper' is 'bad spleen energy', a psychophysiological association also reflected in the English term 'splenetic'.

Spleen-Pancreas


  • Paired Organ : Stomach
  • Color : Orange yellow
  • Peak Hours : 9am-11am
  • Physical Branches : Muscles, lips, mouth, saliva, lymphatic system
  • Functions : Cleanses and 'modifies' the blood
  • Meridian energy : Earth
  • Chakra : First/ Base Chakra

Spleen: Psycho-Emotional Aspects

worry
  • The Spleen houses the body's thoughts and intentions (Yi), and is responsible for analytical thinking, memory, cognition, intelligence, and ideas. The Spleen is responsible for directing memories to the Kidneys for short-term memory storage. 
  • The Kidneys will later transfer these memories to the Heart for long-term memory storage. The Spleen's positive psycho-emotional attributes are trust, honesty, openness, acceptance, equanimity, balance, and impartiality; its negative attributes are worry, excessive thinking, pensiveness, obsessiveness, remorse, regret, obsessions, and self-doubt.

The Spleen Channel Pathway, Acupuncture Points, and Internal Trajectories

Beginning on the inside tip of the big toe, the spleen channel follows the inner aspect of the foot to the arch, then turns up in front of the inner ankle to SP-6. It continues up the leg, just behind the bone, crossing the knee and ascending the anterior thigh from the inner border of the kneecap. 

From the groin it enters the lower abdomen, meets the conception vessel, then resurfaces briefly before penetrating the spleen and stomach. The main channel then ascends through the diaphragm, over the chest, and crosses the lung channel at LU-1. It continues up to the esophagus and under the tongue. An inner branch from the stomach region transports qi up to the heart.









spleen

Internal Trajectories of the Spleen Meridian



The Spleen vessel comes into the abdomen, permeates the spleen, and spirally wraps the stomach, comes up past the diaphragm, surrounds the throat, makes contact with and disperses into the base of the tongue. This passage is interpreted to mean that the spleen meridian rises up the leg to SP-12 on the abdomen, thence to SP-13, to CV-3, to CV-4, to SP-14, to SP-15, to CV-10, to SP-16, to GB-24 to LV-14, to CV-12.


There is also some suggestion of a downward connection to CV-10 from here, which would create a cyclic pattern. Generally, however, the internal trajectory starts from CV-12, passes inside to and permeates the spleen, then comes to and spirally wraps the stomach. There it comes up through or along the esophagus to the base of the tongue. From this trajectory a branch passes to the heart.

Excercise for strengthening Muladhara


Cobra



1. Lie prone on the floor. Stretch your legs back, tops of the feet on the floor. Spread your hands on the floor under your shoulders. Hug the elbows back into your body.2. Press the tops of the feet and thighs and the pubis firmly into the floor.3. On an inhalation, begin to straighten the arms to lift the chest off the floor, going only to the height at which you can maintain a connection through your pubis to your legs. Press the tailbone toward the pubis and lift the pubis toward the navel. Narrow the hip points. Firm but don't harden the buttocks.4. Firm the shoulder blades against the back, puffing the side ribs forward. Lift through the top of the sternum but avoid pushing the front ribs forward, which only hardens the lower back. Distribute the backbend evenly throughout the entire spine.5. Hold the pose anywhere from 15 to 30 seconds, breathing easily. Release back to the floor with an exhalation.

Full Locust Posture



How to do:

Lie face down on the floor on your stomach, hands stretched backwards close to the body and the legs straight. 

Making fists of the hands bring them together beneath the thighs with the wrists touching. Inhale as much air as you can. 

Holding your breath make your head straight and put the chin on the floor (on a folded blanket or towel). Tighten both the legs and lift them up as high as you can. 

Do not bend the knees. Remain in the same posture for a few seconds. Exhale and simultaneously lower the legs slowly to the floor. Do not drop the legs. By the time the legs touch the floor you should finish exhaling. You have completed one round of a most strenuous posture. Relax.

Restrictions:

Start with three rounds on the first day. Do not practice more than four rounds. While doing the asana special attention should be given for keeping the legs tight. Do not bend or fold on the knees. In the initial stage, do not try to retain in the same position excessively. Relax for about 6 10 8 seconds between each round. For the beginners, it is always better to practice the half-locust posture before attempting the full-locust. When you first attempt the locust, you may be disappointed to find that your feet rise only slightly from the floor. Do not be discouraged. This will improve rapidly with practice.

Half - Locust Posture

For the half locust, the position, the breathing and the body conditioning are as same as the full-locust. The only difference is that you lift one leg up at a time. Lift legs alternatively. Do not twist the hips or bend the knee. Repeat lifting 2-4 times each.

Benefits:

The locust brings flexibility to the cervical (upper back) region and strength to the lower back. Brings a rich blood supply to the spine and the whole upper area. Favourably activates the kidneys, liver and all the organs of the lower part of the body. Increases abdominal pressure, regulating intestinal function and strengthening the abdominal walls and relieves back pain.

Dhanurasana (Bow Pose)

This pose is so called because it looks like an archer's bow, the torso and legs representing the body of the bow, and the arms the string.
1. Lie on your belly with your hands alongside your torso, palms up. (You can lie on a folded blanket to pad the front of your torso and legs.) Exhale and bend your knees, bringing your heels as close as you can to your buttocks. Reach back with your hands and take hold of your ankles (but not the tops of the feet). Make sure your knees aren't wider than the width of your hips, and keep your knees hip width for the duration of the pose. 
2. Inhale and strongly lift your heels away from your buttocks and, at the same time, lift your thighs away from the floor. This will have the effect of pulling your upper torso and head off the floor. Burrow the tailbone down toward the floor, and keep your back muscles soft. As you continue lifting the heels and thighs higher, press your shoulder blades firmly against your back to open your heart. Draw the tops of the shoulders away from your ears. Gaze forward. 
3. With the belly pressed against the floor, breathing will be difficult. Breathe more into the back of your torso, and be sure not to stop breathing. 
4. Stay in this pose anywhere from 20 to 30 seconds. Release as you exhale, and lie quietly for a few breaths. You can repeat the pose once or twice more.
Forward Bends
  • Rowing prepares for the forward bends. 
  • Gently stretches back while strengthening abdominals. 
  • Contraindications: sciatica, slipped disc 
  • Sit with legs stretched in front and raise the knees a bit, soles keeping contact with the floor. 
  • With inhalation, reach towards feet mimicking the rowing movement. 
  • Grab rowing pads and with exhalation pull back. 
  • Repeat 10-15 times. 
Preparation for Pascimottanasana is essential for healthy spine. It rejuvenates body and increases gastric fire. Immune system is boosted. 

Contraindications: sciatica, slipped disc 

1. Sit with legs spread. Draw left heel towards trunk, place foot along right thigh.2. Inhale, and when lungs are full start exhaling bending from waist towards the floor. Place arms in front of you.3. Keep exhaling and start moving arms towards the straight leg. Don't push head towards knee, head and trunk should stay in a straight line.4. Place arms on the leg. If head is close to knee, relax it there. If not, bend leg at the knee until it supports torso.
Repeat 3 times on each side.